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How “Seizure” evolved into a European journal of epilepsy and beyond (2003–2010)

  • Paul Boon
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Ghent University & Ghent University Hospital, Reference Center for Refractory Epilepsy, Gent, Belgium.
    Affiliations
    Ghent University & Ghent University Hospital, Reference Center for Refractory Epilepsy, Gent, Belgium

    Academic Center for Epileptology, Kempenhaeghe-Maastricht University Medical Center, Heeze, The Netherlands
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  • Bert Aldenkamp
    Affiliations
    Ghent University & Ghent University Hospital, Reference Center for Refractory Epilepsy, Gent, Belgium

    Academic Center for Epileptology, Kempenhaeghe-Maastricht University Medical Center, Heeze, The Netherlands
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Open ArchivePublished:December 22, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2016.12.013
      In 1997 Seizure was positioned by its founding Dr. Editor Tim Betts on the crossroad of epileptology and psychiatry. Many of the pivotal papers on conditions such as psychogenic non-epileptic seizures have been published in Seizure. Seizure also had an important function as platform for discussions. An example of this was the special supplement published in 2003 on the position and role of the European Epilepsy centres.
      When Paul Boon and Bert Aldenkamp took over the chief-editorship from Tim Betts at the end of 2003, Seizure was a respected journal based in the United Kingdom publishing articles relevant to clinical epileptology, including psychosocial aspects that were not well covered by other scientific journals.
      The newly appointed chief-editors worked with the journal’s owner Epilepsy Action and the publisher Elsevier to redefine the mission and vision of Seizure that would from 2004 on carry as it’s full name: Seizure — European Journal of Epilepsy. The purpose was to make Seizure a truly European and international journal providing a forum for the publication of papers on all topics related to epilepsy and seizure disorders and to share and disseminate knowledge between all disciplines that work in the field of epilepsy. Manuscripts to be published would include basic (but primarily translational) research related to the condition itself, the differential diagnosis, natural history and epidemiology of seizures, and the investigation and practical management of epilepsy (including drug treatment, neurosurgery and non-medical and behavioural treatments). The editors wanted the journal to also keep reflecting the social and psychological burden and impact of epilepsy on the patient, families and society, and the methods and ideas that may help to alleviate the impact, handicaps and stigma caused by epilepsy.
      As a consequence Seizure — European Journal of Epilepsy retained a unique position vis-à-vis the main other journals such as Epilepsia, Epilepsy Research, Epileptic Disorders and the more recently created US-based journal Epilepsy & Behaviour. In the period 2003–2010, Seizure would publish original high-quality clinical research, occasional basic research contributions with a relevant link to the clinic and clinical articles with an emphasis on co-morbidity, the social burden of epilepsy and the interface between epileptology and psychiatry.
      In the meanwhile, an editorial office was created at Kempenhaeghe, the leading epilepsy expertise center in the Netherlands where Aldenkamp and Boon would meet on a weekly basis to guide a more professionalized and e-based submission and peer review process. A large database of reviewers was created, most of them from outside the UK. A new editorial board was appointed, consisting of a large group of key opinion leaders in various aspects of epilepsy from inside and outside Europe. The numbers of submissions grew constantly over the years as did rejection rates and to a lesser degree the number of published articles. Between 2003 and 2010 the impact factor doubled to 2.3. The journal became a strong brand in emerging countries, especially in Asian countries with fast growing epilepsy research communities.
      When Paul Boon and Bert Aldenkamp left their joint editorship of Seizure in 2010, the journal had evolved into a truly “Made in Europe” clinical epilepsy journal with an international authorship and a global audience, ready for the next challenge.

      Conflict of interest statement

      The authors report no conflict of interest.